The Awakening Setting Essay Of The Storm

Storms Of Passion And Nature: Kate Chopin's "The Storm"

Kate Chopin's "The Storm" focuses on two types of storms; one of these is a fierce violent occurrence of the natural world. The second storm considered a storm of life, with its play on emotion, mind and heart. It describes or for lack of a better word, explains the inner feelings of instant lust for a former boyfriend, perhaps feelings that were never put to rest in the recesses of her young mind, when she married her husband, Bobinot. She has been quite content to live her life in Southern Louisiana near the town of Biloxi with her family.

She probably didn't even think too much about what was about to take place that fateful afternoon when Alcee Laballiere came riding back into her life, after an absence of several years. She just as likely doesn't realize the extent of what emotions will come into play as these two storms are gathering around her. Nature and fate will mount high with emotion as they build up to a rising crescendo with each moment of anticipation of life and love.

With the approaching storm of wind, rain, lightening and thunder, Calixta is calmly sewing and doesn't appear to be too concerned over the sudden change of the weather. When the light of the day darkens she realizes that she has left her husband's Sunday clothes airing out on the clothesline. Fearing they will be ruined in the upcoming storm of rain and wind, she hurriedly runs outside to bring them into the house.

As she is gathering the clothes, she sees the approach of her former boyfriend, perhaps the passion of her youth. In riding up to the gate, Alcee is well aware of the former emotions he once held and perhaps still holds on to in regard to Calixta. He is also aware of knowing she will allow him inside of her home, due to the upcoming storm. He approaches her with an outward calm of innocence as he requests shelter from the gathering storm. The way the story is told the very atmosphere is charged with electricity and sexual tension caused by the storm and the unexpected arrival of Alcee.

She allows herself to accept the inevitable feelings to grow, as she in the back of her mind is concerned for the welfare of her husband and son. She silently prays for their safety and truly hopes they have not left Friedheimer's store.

Both storms are beginning to rage, it becomes "stiflingly hot" as the "rain is coming down in sheets obscuring the view of the cabins that are off in the distance and enveloping the distant wood in a gray mist." The storm grows so strong that is creates the feeling of a wall, blocking the outside work. The image of thick mist creates a near magical setting and a feeling of enchantment follows.

The action begins when lightening strikes a tree across the field. Calixta basically falls into the arms of Alcee, who is obviously standing very close to her as she peers out the window, watching with anxiety for her husband and son's welfare. With the unexpected crashing of the tree she is drawn into the arms of...

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The Importance of Setting and Symbols in "The Awakening" by Kate Chopin

1014 Words5 Pages

Ranging from caged parrots to the meadow in Kentucky, symbols and settings in The Awakening are prominent and provide a deeper meaning than the text does alone. Throughout The Awakening by Kate Chopin, symbols and setting recur representing Edna’s current progress in her awakening. The reader can interpret these and see a timeline of Edna’s changes and turmoil as she undergoes her changes and awakening. The setting Edna is in directly affects her temperament and awakening: Grand Isle provides her with a sense of freedom; New Orleans, restriction; the “pigeon house”, relief from social constraints. While at Grand Isle, Edna feels more freedom than she does at her conventional home in New Orleans. Instead of “Mrs. Pontellier… remaining in…show more content…

When Edna eats dinner with Leonce after going out on Tuesday, he exclaims, “Out!... Why, what could have taken you out on Tuesday? What did you have to do?” (Chopin 85). Leonce’s remark of disgust and anger exemplifies the harsh social structure of the Creole society. Edna wants to go out while in New Orleans, but society’s gender roles see it as inappropriate; yet, Edna still goes out and follows her heart, showing another chapter in her awakening. When Edna has her party at the pigeon house, she shows another chapter in her awakening, “this time, however, she casts herself as a queen, as opposed to the virginal Snow White she enacted at Madame Antoine's” (Euripidies). When Edna is finally in a setting where she does not have social restraints she shows her true self and comes off as a queen – something most women of this era are not capable of. This image gives Edna a sense of independence and liberty, which is yet another milestone in her awakening. The stepping stones in Edna’s awakening can be seen through symbols: birds, clothes, and even the ocean. The symbols of caged birds in The Awakening represent Edna’s entrapment as a wife and mother, along with all of the other Victorian women. When Leonce is sitting by the parrots reading his newspaper, the parrot spoke, “a language which nobody understood” (Chopin 5). Edna, just like the parrot, can not be understood. Edna can not communicate her feelings with others, her feelings being the “language” that nobody

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